Volume 19, Issue 1 (Pajouhan Scientific Journal, Autumn 2020)                   psj 2020, 19(1): 1-8 | Back to browse issues page


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Javadi S, Golparvar M, Izadi R. Family Mode Deactivation Therapy: Treatment for Adolescent Behavioral Problems. psj. 2020; 19 (1) :1-8
URL: http://psj.umsha.ac.ir/article-1-592-en.html
1- PhD Student in Psychology, Department of Psychology, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Khorasgan) Branch, Isfahan, Iran
2- Associate Professor in Psychology, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Khorasgan) Branch, Isfahan, Iran , drmgolparvar@hotmail.com
3- Assistant Professor in Psychology, Safahan Nonprofit Higher Education Institute, Isfahan, Iran
Abstract:   (1313 Views)
Background and Objective: The family traditionally has played a unique role in the development and care for adolescents. For this reason, scientists have consistently sought to formulate and introduce new family-based therapeutic approaches to further enhance the functions of this important social institution. In this manuscript, for the first time in Iran, one of the new treatments in this field is discussed.
Materials and Methods: In this study, a review of the theoretical and research background in the field of family mode deactivation therapy is presented and introduced.
Results: Family Mode Deactivation Therapy has emerged as a third wave treatment for adolescents with behavioral problems. In this treatment, a unique integration of family based mode deactivation, evaluation, enlightenment, and reorientation of fundamental beliefs techniques is used to eliminate problematic behaviors during and after treatment. This treatment is especially applicable in the context of Iranian families.
Conclusion: Family mode deactivation therapy, as a modern therapy, is able to reduce the behavioral problems in adolescents. Therefore, we recommend the use of this treatment to psychotherapists.
Full-Text [PDF 611 kb]   (303 Downloads)    
Type of Study: Review Article | Subject: Psychology and Psychiatry
Received: 2020/05/9 | Accepted: 2020/07/5 | Published: 2020/09/25

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